Weekly newspaper review: Fairytales, clocks and rats

Weekly newspaper review: Fairytales, clocks and rats

Lurgan MailImage copyright
Lurgan Mail

Banbridge Chronicle 9/2/17Image copyright
Banbridge Chronicle

Andersonstown NewsImage copyright
Andersonstown News

Coleraine Times front page 9/2/17Image copyright
Coleraine Times

Hansel and Gretel, a cathedral clock and rats all make the headlines in the weekly papers.

The brother of a UVF murder victim has appealed to those responsible for destroying a memorial to “stop terrorising the people of Tullygally”.

Brendan Duffy is pictured beside the memorial to his sister, Eileen Duffy, and two others who were killed by loyalists in a mobile shop in Craigavon in 1991.

It was destroyed by vandals last weekend.

Mr Duffy told the Lurgan Mail his family had been upset by its destruction but were heartened by the support they had received, as well as offers to help rebuild the memorial.

Two young dancers from Lurgan also feature in the paper.

Zarah Freeburn, 11, and Evie Macdonald, 12, are taking centre stage at the Grand Opera House in Belfast this week.

They were selected to play the part of the children in the Scottish Ballet’s production of Hansel and Gretel.

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The paper reports on a scheme at the Causeway Hospital in Coleraine which is reducing the number of diabetes-related amputations by 90%

“Pilot project helps tackle silent killer”, is the front page headline in the Coleraine Times.

It reports on a scheme at the Causeway Hospital in Coleraine which is reducing the number of diabetes-related amputations by 90%.

Reduction

Under the Diabetes Foot Pathway scheme, patients see a podiatrist, dietician and nurse under one roof and within 48 hours if required.

The lead doctor of the project, Dr Brian Connor, says they have already seen a reduction in the number of amputations within the Northern Health Trust as a result.

The paper also reports on some good news for rate payers.

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Pacemaker

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A source within the Belfast Trust told the paper that an ambulance had to be sent from Bangor to Belfast to respond to a report of an unconscious child because of a shortage in the city

Councillors in the Causeway Coast and Glens have agreed to a rate freeze for a second consecutive year.

However, the Coleraine Times adds that householders will still see an increase in their bills when the regional rate, which is outside council control, is factored in.

Staying on health-related matters and pressures on the Ambulance Service come under the spotlight in the Andersonstown News.

Emergency situations

A source within the Belfast Trust told the paper an ambulance had to be sent from Bangor to Belfast to respond to a report of an unconscious child because of a shortage in the city.

The source added this was due to all Belfast-based ambulance crews being engaged in emergency situations or commuting patients to the Ulster Hospital.

They warned that the Belfast Trust is “unable to cope with the volume of sick people”.

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Thinkstock

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Residents at the apartment complex say they are at their wits end over what they say is a ‘lack of action’ to tackle the rat infestation

Concerns of a different kind feature inside the paper.

Residents at an apartment complex in the city centre say they are at their wits end over a “lack of action” to tackle a rat infestation.

Playground

When the paper’s reporter and photographer went to the College Place complex they saw rats jumping inside the communal bins in the car park and smelt a strong odour.

Residents says the car park has become a playground for the rodents and fear it is only a matter of time before they’re found inside their homes.

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One boy was arrested during the melee at Holy Cross College but later released back into the care of his parents

Helm Housing says its contractor has taken steps to introduce a “number of rodent control measures” and it will monitor the situation until it is resolved.

Resolution of a different kind was needed after a fight involving a number of pupils broke out at County Tyrone school.

The Strabane Chronicle says two teaching unions have given their backing to staff at Holy Cross College in Strabane following the incident on Tuesday.

Also making the headlines is news that the introduction of CCTV cameras in the town has moved a stop closer.

A spokesperson for Derry City and Strabane District Council confirmed that seven cameras have been costed.

The papers says if funds can be secured then the matter is likely to go before councillors to be signed off.

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Pacemaker

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Arlene Foster told party members that ‘if you feed a crocodile, it will keep coming back for more’

DUP leader Arlene Foster comes under fire from the Fermanagh Herald who report that there has been “palpable anger” in the local area following her comments on the Irish language.

The Fermanagh native told a DUP election event earlier this week that she would never agree to an Irish Language act and suggested there was more need for a Polish Language act as more people spoke it in Northern Ireland.

‘Frightening’

A father whose children attend an Irish speaking school in Lisnaskea said the outgoing first minister’s comments were “insulting”.

The paper’s leader says referring to those who wished to protect the Irish language in the same breath as hungry crocodiles was “frightening coming from a woman aspiring to lead all the people in the community”.

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The clock, which was manufactured by John Smith and Sons of Derby in 1935, fell silent 14 months ago

Elsewhere and time stands still no more for the clock at St Macartin’s Cathedral in Enniskillen.

The clock, which was manufactured by John Smith and Sons of Derby in 1935, fell silent 14 months ago.

‘Generous donations’

Following an inspection, technical staff from Smiths recommended an upgrade of the clock’s auto-winding system.

“The upgrading of the clock was an expensive undertaking and the select vestry of St Macartin’s are deeply indebted to those who have made it possible by their generous donations,” Samuel Morrow from St Macartin’s told the paper.

Talking of good deeds, the Banbridge Chronicle says a pioneering food share scheme will be launched in the County Down town on Friday.

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EPA

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Several local businesses have given their backing, including Tescos

It says the FoodShare scheme is the first of its kind in the borough and will operate from The Hub building at the Grace Generation Church.

Several local businesses have given their backing, including Tescos and two bakeries.

‘Selfless stranger’

Co-ordinator Neil Adair says the aim is to reduce food waste in the community and says it will be open weekly to anyone to “come along and take what they want”.

Food for thought!

Source: BBC News – Northern Ireland

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